The Passing Lane: Passing the Competition Online by Marnie Perhson

Issue #2 Monday, Sept. 21, 1998

About the Author:

Marnie Perhson

Marnie Pehrson, founder of C.E.S. Business Consultants and the International Association of Computer Professionals, develops products that help computer professionals market and manage their businesses.

She is author of
How to Run a Successful Computer Training Business,

How to Get & Keep Customers for Your Computer-based Business


and Keeping Your Sanity in a Home Business.

Marnie also develops business plans, marketing strategies, financial projections, & proposals for Internet projects. Her plans and strategies have garnered clients an average of $100,000 each in seed capital.

Marnie lives on a Georgia farm with her husband and their six children.

Contact:
C.E.S. Business Consultants
Ringgold, Georgia
http://www.pwgroup.com
mailto:marniep@pwgroup.com
TEL: 706-866-2295

5 Ways to Build Web Traffic

5 Ways to Build Web Traffic
by: Marnie L. Pehrson


Everyone knows you need to register your site with the major search engines to get any Web traffic, but what about after that? Let's face it, it's getting harder and harder to put up a page, register it with some search engines and get any significant traffic. There's just too much competition out there. There are five proven tactics I've used and seen used to build a good traffic base:

  1. Run periodic contests. If you sell products/services from your Web site, give away a sample in a monthly drawing. You can register your contest with various contest sites like www.sweepstakesonline.com and a dozen or so others. This is a great way to pull traffic to your site and feature your products in a non-pressured way. If you don't sell anything or can't afford to give away a sample, find other sites that do and offer them the exposure of being promoted on your site in exchange for a prize donation. An associate of mine is the master of Web contests. Alanna Webb of www.lovestories.com features a different prize every day! She gets hundreds of entries/day and attributes much of her traffic (over 1 million impressions/month) to her contests.
  2. Create a periodic newsletter and distribute it at least monthly. Gather e-mail (and other pertinent data) on visitors to your site by offering them a free newsletter on your industry or specialty. Make it fresh and informative, and give them an incentive to visit your site again. You can do this by e-mailing your newsletter with teaser-blurbs on each article or tip and then point them back to your site for more.
  3. Create sponsorship alliances with other well-trafficked sites that target your same audience. Alexa Internet has been a good sponsorship alliance for my web site. I feature their button on all my pages, and they show my banner on their toolbar. Look around for sites that you can swap links, banners, or buttons with. And be selective. You only have so much space.
  4. Keep your content fresh. If you want people to come back, you have to give them an incentive to do so. If your site is stagnant, why would anyone want to return? Let them know when you make updates so they'll know to come back. For example, here at the Sideroad it's a well-established fact that more great articles will be added every Monday.
  5. Become known as an expert in your field by networking on-line. This is a whole sermon in itself, and will be the topic of an upcoming article. Here are a few tips:
  • Become active on mail-lists that target your typical client. Talk it up, offer advice, and be sure to have a good signature line that explains what you do.
  • If you can write well, submit articles to e-zines that target your market.
  • Become active in chat forums that center on your specialty. Volunteer as a guest speaker for chat forums.
  • Help others by posting comments on message boards.
  • Become active in newsgroups.

There are dozens of ways to build traffic, but over the last few years, I've seen the best results from these relatively cost-free methods. Tune in next week for the strategies behind "Successful Net Networking."


Text Copyright © 1998, Marnie Pehrson. Part of the original Sideroad.
The new Sideroad is now receiving traffic at www.sideroad.com.