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The SeamLess Life

Issue #14 - November 10, 1998

Make Way for the Payoffs

In issue 13 we briefly described the benefits you receive when you commit to a quest for a more SeamLess Life™ -- when you pack up and head out literally "on the journey." As coaches, we give you maps and possibility markers to watch for and leverage along the way. But, you do the work: the trail-blazing, the documenting, the exploratory venturing, and reflecting on what you've learned. You also learn to trust your process, even when you do not yet fully understand it.

What can you expect when you start getting results and your well-being gets strengthened? How do you recognize the signs?

  1. You have clarity about your key Needs and core Values.
    It's a "given" rather than the exception. Much like the sonar gift of the dolphin, one on the quest for the SeamLess Life™ begins to develop an acute sense-of-path. You instinctively know where you are and how to traverse the way.

This is a big encourager. Many report that they do not have to know exactly who or what is about to be on 'the path' with them, nor do they need to know exactly where the path itself is taking them next. But they definitely have this sense of where they are, and where there are generally heading... it's on-track.

Even better, they know when they are on-path and when they are off-path. They sense when they are heading down a "rabbit trail." Now, there's nothing wrong with rabbit trails - not as long as you know one when you see it and you're choosing to explore it. It's a jaunt, and you know it. You also know, when the rabbit is gone and out of reach, to get back on track.

Why is this so consistently happening for those on the quest? Well, there has to be SOME direct and obvious payoff for ALL that Vision, Purpose, Mission endeavor. The 'doing' part of such laborious work feels, to most, like a trudge through the ditch or at least rough and uncharted terrain.

We know often they do it simply because we encourage it - "just do it" and trust in the process. Later you get the pleasure of having personal statements of Vision, Purpose, and Mission -- when you get some distance from the creation process and more obvious enjoyment of the benefits.

  1. Your focus and ability to prioritize sharpen.
    You see clearly the link between how you bring yourself to your daily life and work. You know how this links to the results you want to produce.

Surprisingly, this clear focus doesn't usually lead to more action steps or longer "To Do" lists. You'd think an increased capacity for setting effective priorities would lead to more and more specifics and more accurate detail logged and accounted for in advance of the action commitments.

Not necessarily so... in fact it's more often the reverse. It leads, instead, to a 'trust the moment' mind set. You feel more free. Then, you find a new level of passion for your life and work, which fuels a 'go for it' attitude. You end up with more of what it takes to see things through and put them over the top. You learn to leap rather than just stepping better.

  1. You need less and less data or proof for decisions.
    You start to sense and draw conclusions more and more dependably, and know things more intuitively.

  2. You trust that you'll land in ready position for the next-best set of steps to take - no matter what the interruption or disruption.

    You can then go goalless: be free to respond to the moment and the new opportunity, with less sense of having to "make it happen" and more confidence it will happen, it will find you. You don't need to work so hard to make things happen.

  3. You trust more.
    Deepak Chopra calls this "walking into the void" of possibility. There's no assurance of a specific outcome, but you're willing to accept and then maximize whatever outcome awaits.

    Quite clearly, this takes trust. You have that ability to trust yourself, and to trust that the world around you is a supportive place. You've taken the time to identify and honor your own personal drummer. The drummers now play for you at such times!

Now all this doesn't mean life doesn't still happen: things get off-track, and problems occur. But it does mean you bring a whole new sense of perspective to whatever does come up. You have some natural distance and objectivity. It keeps you sane and wise in the face of adversity. You even laugh!

This gives you a more useful view of possibilities. You don't get caught up in the detail or the drama of it all if it's a difficult or combustible set of circumstances.

You've gone from being a fireman in your life (constantly putting out crises, anticipating the next one) to someone who knows how to handle fire to create.

We believe that all of this gives you great resilience - a topic which we'll explore in-depth in Issue #15. See you then!


Contact us with questions or suggestions.
Sherry can be reached at sherry@sherrylowry.com.
The Lowry Group, Austin, Texas USA,
Website: www.sherrylowry.com.

Ph: 512-527-0097

Diane and Sherry's book, Discovering Your Best Self Through the Art of Coaching, can be ordered at http://www.sherrylowry.com/book.htm.




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Text © Diane Menendez & Sherry Lowry, 1998, 1999. Part of the original Sideroad.
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